2012 Books

In years past, I’ve posted a list of the books that I’d read cover-to-cover over the course of the year. I never got around to it last year, but thought I’d resume the habit. All the usual caveats attain with regard to my categorization; it is inevitably arbitrary and disputable. For most categories, I’ve put the book that I found to be most illuminating or entertaining in Bold face, and the book that I don’t particularly recommend in a shade of the color brown.

I’m happy to say that I’ve read quite a bit more fiction this year than in several previous years, and I’m close to being able to include DFW’s Infinite Jest on the list, though it will have to wait for next year. Of course, I wish that I’d taken the time to read more, but unfortunately reading seems to be what “gives” when I’m under the gun of writing or application deadlines. Since I never posted last year’s books, I’ve included that list separately, below the break.

What books from your 2012 reading will your thoughts carry into 2013?

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2012

Theology:

Christopher A. Beeley, Gregory of Nazianzus on the Trinity and the Knowledge of God: In Your Light we see Light, 396.

Sigurd Bergmann, Creation Set Free: The Spirit as Liberator of Nature, 389.

Peter Scott, A Political Theology of Nature, 275.

Kevin Corrigan, Evagrius and Gregory: Mind, Soul, and Body in the 4th Century, 245.

Daniel Colucciello Barber, On Diaspora: Christianity, Religion, and Secularity, 155.

David Clough, On Animals: Volume I, Systematic Theology, 215.

Deborah Creamer, Disability and Christian Theology: Embodied Limits and Constructive Possibilities, 156.

David Kelsey, Eccentric Existence: A Theological Anthropology vol. 1, 602.

David Kelsey, Eccentric Existence: A Theological Anthropology vol. 2, 490.

 

Philosophy:

Jean-Christophe Bailly, The Animal Side, 87.

Giorgio Agamben, The Kingdom and the Glory: For a Theological Genealogy of Economy and Government, 303.

Michael Naas, Miracle and Machine: Jacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media, 407.

Penelope Deutscher, How To Read: Derrida, 133.

Richard Sorabji, Animal Minds and Human Morals: The Origins of the Western Debate, 267.

Georges Bataille, Theory of Religion, 126.

Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There, 228.

Donna J. Haraway, When Species Meet, 423.

Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves, 230.

Peter Singer, Animal Liberation, 320.

 

History/Historiography:

Ingvild Sælid Gilhus, Animals, Gods and Humans: Changing Attitudes to Animals in Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Ideas, 322.

Robert M. Grant, Early Christians and Animals, 214.

James Serpell, In the Company of Animals, 215.

David Brakke, Demons and the Making of the Monk: Spiritual Combat in Early Christianity, 308.

Julia S. Konstantinovsky, Evagrius Ponticus: The Making of a Gnostic, 217.

 

Biblical Studies:

Scot McKnight, Junia is Not Alone, 25.

 

Biography/Memoir:

John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra, 270.

Fiction/Literature:

Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, 160.

Ed Abbey, The Monkey Wrench Gang, 385.

Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow, 776.

Aldous Huxley, Brave New World, 232.

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Devils, 704.

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Uncle’s Dream, 155.

David Foster Wallace, The Broom of the System, 467.

 

Sports:

Christopher McDougall, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World has Never Seen, 287.

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